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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 11, 2010 7:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Great Books on Jazz

Anyone have any recommendations? Thanks.

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Poster: roughyed Date: Apr 11, 2010 3:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

From a very British viewpoint:
George Melly - Owning Up; Rum Bum & Concertina
Humphrey Lyttelton - Why No Beethoven?
Spike Milligan - his autobiographical series from Adolf Hitler, My Part In His Downfall to Peace Work. This is worth a read in its own right anyway.

From a fascinating/barking mad/disturbing viewpoint:
Charles Mingus - Beneath The Underdog

This post was modified by roughyed on 2010-04-11 22:51:35

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Poster: midnight sun Date: Apr 11, 2010 10:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

depends what you're into, i found this book to be exceptional because the main focus is on Trane's musical evolution rather than personal details
http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=1213

presumably other jazz musicians are also covered in the same way within the U. of Mich. series
http://www.press.umich.edu/titleDetailDesc.do?id=12075

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Poster: Incornsyucopia Date: Apr 12, 2010 7:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

If you want to get outside the "Great Man" myth of jazz historiography (so perniciously peddled by Ken Burns in his documentary with the help of Wynton Marsalis and Stanley Crouch among others) I'd highly recommend the book "Jazz" by Gary Giddins and Scott Deveaux. (http://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Gary-Giddins/dp/0393068617/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&;s=books&qid=1271124809&sr=8-1)

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Poster: Morning Dewd Date: Apr 11, 2010 8:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

Miles, the autobiography
By Miles Davis, Quincy Troupe

This post was modified by Morning Dewd on 2010-04-11 15:45:22

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Apr 11, 2010 3:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

I second the Miles Davis auto biography, a virtual who's who of Jazz, at least my favorite eras of Jazz. Beware - you'll find yourself suddenly going on a quest to buy more and more jazz, not a bad thing unless you bust out the credit card to do it. The good news is that there a million master peices at affordable prices.

on a side note who'd of thought of the multitude of uses for the phrase mother f*cker? I challenge anyone to find more than two pages in a row where he doesn't use it

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Apr 12, 2010 2:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

Yea, and his comments re Trane and Cicely Tyson are pretty bad. Miles is classic example of an incredible musician/artist that leaves a lot to be desired in the "nice guy" category.

One thing you can say, unlikely that Miles book was heavily "ghostwritten" - reads more like a transcription of Miles talking.

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Poster: vapors Date: Apr 11, 2010 8:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

My jazz bible – The Penguin Guide To Jazz on CD (seventh edition 2004) by Richard Cook and Brian Morton.

“The leader in its field … if you only own one book on jazz, it really should be this one.” International Record Review

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Poster: beep* Date: Apr 11, 2010 9:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

There are some good historical reads available right here.....

http://www.archive.org/details/bookofjazz001817mbp

http://www.archive.org/details/jazzitsevolution000731mbp

http://www.archive.org/details/historyofjazzina030270mbp

http://www.archive.org/details/shiningtrumpetsa011141mbp

And here's Phil Elwood's radio show (he taught "Jazz and Blues in the American Culture" at Laney College in Oakland, CA) talking about ragtime's history and another show about Louis Armstrong's legacy.....

http://www.archive.org/details/C_1964_04_21

http://www.archive.org/details/AM_1971_07_13

*



This post was modified by beep* on 2010-04-12 04:07:48

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Poster: RBNW....new and improved! Date: Apr 11, 2010 5:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

http://www.dummies.com/store/product/Jazz-For-Dummies-2nd-Edition.productCd-0471768448.html

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Poster: gumby69 Date: Apr 12, 2010 1:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

Fantastic book being a huge Jaco fan this book was a treat.

http://www.amazon.com/Jaco-Extraordinary-Tragic-Life-Pastorius/dp/0879308591/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&;s=books&qid=1271104943&sr=8-4

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 11, 2010 7:50am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

Geoff Dyer, "But Beautiful."

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Poster: midnightcarousel Date: Apr 11, 2010 1:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

I was going to say that one too. An incredibly revealing survey of the life and music of a dozen or so jazz musicians.

I especially liked the chapter on Monk...

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 11, 2010 6:44pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

Geoff Dyer's other books are great too, I'm not even particularly into jazz, I just read it because I read Geoff Dyer, but it taught me a lot.

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Apr 11, 2010 11:22am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

Here is one I like .
http://www.amazon.com/Ascension-John-Coltrane-His-Quest/dp/0306806444
The Miles Auto-Bio is great , but you might want to also read an outside source on him also .

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Poster: Glenn Walker Date: Oct 22, 2013 1:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

I am surprised no one has brought up " The Bear Comes Home " by Rafi Zabor. I have bought, read, and given away multiple copies over the last 15 years. Here's the short synopsis:

Two jazz musicians / street performers are trying to scrape by in NYC. One ( Jones ) is kind of a wash-out but does his best to take care of his best friend, a brilliant but troubled poet / beatnik / saxophone player who also happens to be a bear. An actual Shakespeare-quoting, jazz-obsessed, hard-to-handle bear who has a tendency to wander the streets of NYC in an oversized raincoat and floppy hat with his sax in tow seeking love, God, and a safe place to jam.

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Poster: Glenn Walker Date: Oct 22, 2013 7:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Great Books on Jazz

Here's the cover, highly recommended!

Attachment: image.jpg